Taxpayer – ATO Ogratuit http://atoogratuit.com/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:05:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://atoogratuit.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-5-150x150.png Taxpayer – ATO Ogratuit http://atoogratuit.com/ 32 32 Should taxpayers bet on blue hydrogen and carbon capture? https://atoogratuit.com/should-taxpayers-bet-on-blue-hydrogen-and-carbon-capture/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/should-taxpayers-bet-on-blue-hydrogen-and-carbon-capture/ Americans have an important decision to make: do we fully embrace renewable energy or divert scarce public funding to explore unproven technologies such as blue hydrogen (hydrogen produced from natural gas) and carbon capture who can double the dependence on fossil fuels? This issue is at the heart of the 13th Clean Energy Ministerial, being […]]]>

Americans have an important decision to make: do we fully embrace renewable energy or divert scarce public funding to explore unproven technologies such as blue hydrogen (hydrogen produced from natural gas) and carbon capture who can double the dependence on fossil fuels?

This issue is at the heart of the 13th Clean Energy Ministerial, being held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania this week. Politicians, CEOs and energy leaders will come together to discuss how to accelerate the transition to clean energy. Several events that promote blue hydrogen and carbon capture and storage (CCS) or carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies feature prominently.

Alongside the ministerial meeting, grassroots organizations convened the Clean Energy Justice Convergence to warn against “clean” energy pathways that can perpetuate reliance on fossil fuel industries. Members of the public are invited to visit the communities living next to shale wells, compressor stations and pipelines or those next to the Shell petrochemical complex just outside Pittsburgh. A series of workshops and panel discussions will discuss energy pathway choices in the Ohio Valley region.

These discussions reflect the dilemma facing fossil fuel-dependent regions across America, from the Gulf Coast to Western states. The Infrastructure Act provision of $8 billion in grants for four hydrogen hubs has sparked a race among fossil fuel states to position themselves as leaders in blue hydrogen and CCUS technologies.

The vision is to produce hydrogen from natural gas and then use CCUS technologies to capture the carbon dioxide byproduct. The carbon dioxide would be transported through a network of pipelines either to be injected underground for storage or to be used in some form. The increased financial incentives of the Cut Inflation Act for CCUS have also generated enthusiasm for these technologies.

Taxpayers need to ask themselves the tough question: Do investments in blue hydrogen and CCUS have a reasonable chance of generating financially viable businesses without more demands for taxpayer subsidies?

Hydrogen and CCUS have their narrow applications in reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Hydrogen can be used as a fuel for heavy transport over long distances, for which direct electrification is less feasible. The cleanest way to produce hydrogen is to run electricity, generated by wind and solar power, through water to produce green hydrogen. As wind and solar prices drop, green hydrogen will become more competitive. In April, Bloomberg New Energy Finance reported that green hydrogen is already cheaper than gray hydrogen — hydrogen produced from fossil gas without capturing the carbon dioxide byproduct — in some parts of the United States. Europe, Middle East and Africa, with high natural gas prices. Another January report from Rethink Energy predicted that green hydrogen would become competitive with gray hydrogen, with the expected drop in costs for wind and solar power and electrolysers.

CCUS can be used to capture carbon dioxide from several hard-to-decarbonize industries such as steel and cement. However, it is not financially sound to look to CCUS to prolong reliance on coal or natural gas power plants.

Already, Pennsylvanians’ electricity bills are becoming unaffordable due to rising natural gas prices. West Virginia ratepayers have grappled with the costs of unprofitable coal plants. Adding CCUS technologies to coal and natural gas power plants will only increase the cost of power generation even more. Indeed, such a scheme will be funded on the backs of Wyoming taxpayers. In contrast, the wind, solar, storage and demand response portfolio is already cost competitive with coal and natural gas in many parts of the United States.

Advocates of blue hydrogen and CCUS technologies argue that these technologies can extend the longevity of natural gas and coal, and therefore save jobs. However, it is unwise to place hopes of stable jobs in financially risky businesses. On the contrary, it would be more prudent to diversify the economies of fossil fuel regions by deploying renewable energy and energy efficiency and beyond.

The Ohio Valley region has learned that perpetual reliance on fossil fuels does not guarantee jobs for workers. The shale boom has not delivered the scale of job creation promised by shale advocates, nor has the venture delivered a net economic benefit, given the health, environmental and climate costs. According to a recent report, the Shell petrochemical complex got $1.7 billion in tax subsidies, but only provides 600 permanent jobs and is expected to cause $16 million in health damage in its host country.

The financial viability of blue hydrogen and CCUS are not the only concerns of these companies. Blue hydrogen relies on the extraction of natural gas which has had adverse effects on health and the environment. CCUS requires the construction of pipelines and underground storage, which presents health, safety and environmental risks. About 500 organizations have raised concerns about CCUS with US and Canadian policymakers and instead called for more efforts to deploy wind, solar and storage and to build transmission lines.

Before taxpayers accept the land for any blue hydrogen and/or CCUS projects, we would be wise to review every bet we take.

Shanti Gamper-Rabindran is a professor at the University of Pittsburgh and author of “America’s Energy Bet: People, Economy, and Planet.

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Foreign Trust Penalties (Failure to Report Forms 3520/3520-A) https://atoogratuit.com/foreign-trust-penalties-failure-to-report-forms-3520-3520-a/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:56:01 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/foreign-trust-penalties-failure-to-report-forms-3520-3520-a/ Foreign Trust Penalties for Late Filing 3520/3520-A To facilitate compliance with offshore reporting initiatives, the IRS has developed many different international information reporting forms that require taxpayers to disclose offshore assets such as foreign businesses, accounts, investments, and foreign trusts to the US government. And, for the past few years, the Internal Revenue Service has […]]]>

Foreign Trust Penalties for Late Filing 3520/3520-A

To facilitate compliance with offshore reporting initiatives, the IRS has developed many different international information reporting forms that require taxpayers to disclose offshore assets such as foreign businesses, accounts, investments, and foreign trusts to the US government. And, for the past few years, the Internal Revenue Service has been on the lookout for taxpayers who failed to complete international information forms in a timely manner – or filed them late. With specific regard to the reporting of foreign trusts, taxpayers who hold property or an interest in a foreign trust may be required to file Forms 3520 and 3520-A annually. Failure to complete these forms may result in significant fines and penalties. If you hold property or an interest in a foreign trust, here are six things you should know about foreign trust reporting and penalties.

Two main forms: 3520 and 3520-A

The two main tax forms a U.S. person may have to file when owning property or an interest in a foreign trust are Form 3520 and Form 3520–A. Depending on the facts and circumstances of the situation, taxpayers may have to file one or both forms. For example, where a US person is the owner of a foreign trust, they complete Forms 3520 and 3520-A – but where the person is only a beneficiary of the foreign trust, they are (usually) required to complete Form 3520 to report the foreign trust — and only when they receive a distribution.

Two different due dates and extension forms

Form 3520 is due when the filer’s individual tax return is due, including extensions. For example, if the person files an extension (such as Form 4868), Form 3520 is also extended, but Form 3520-A works differently. Form 3520-A is due March 15 (it may vary depending on the tax year of the trust) and to request an extension the taxpayer must file a separate Form 7004 (substitute filing rules may apply). ‘to apply).

Multiple penalties for the same trust (Wilson)

It is very common for a taxpayer to be both the owner of a foreign trust and a beneficiary of the same trust. In this type of situation, the taxpayer may have to file Forms 3520 and 3520-A. If the taxpayer fails to file these forms, the taxpayer may be penalized twice for failing to report for the same trust. This was the result in the case of Wilson.

Taxable penalties are different from other penalties

Forms 3520/3520-A are also different from other forms when it comes to penalties. As with most penalties related to international reporting forms, fines involving Forms 3520/3520-A are considered “taxable penalties”. This means that the first notice of non-compliance the taxpayer will receive regarding the penalty will be the actual penalty notice — usually through the receipt of a CP15 notice. This is different from other penalties where the taxpayer may be subject to audit or review – and was already advised that a potential penalty could be imposed (and could formulate a strategy upfront). There are various procedures available to taxpayers to attempt to reduce the penalty.

Foreign Trust Exceptions and Exclusions

The main exclusions for having to complete Forms 3520/3520-A relate to foreign pensions – which are technically considered foreign trusts (based on the relationship between the owner of the trust, the trustee/administrator and the beneficiaries of the trust). It is important to note that not all foreign trusts require the taxpayer to file Forms 3520 and 3520-A. For example, Tax Procedure 2014-55 provides a specific exception for Canadian retirement trusts (RRSPs and RRIFs) as well as Tax Procedure 2020-2017 — which eliminates the reporting of certain tax-deferred savings trusts for retirement and others, if they meet certain requirements – although FBAR and FATCA are still required.

Penalty Waivers and Reduction

When a person has been assessed penalties, there are various procedures a taxpayer can use to avoid, minimize, or reduce the penalties. The IRS recently issued Notice 2022-36 in late August 2022 which serves to eliminate or avoid penalties for late filed Forms 3520 and 3520-A. Alternatively, taxpayers should consider using one of the offshore disclosure programs to try to minimize or avoid penalties for foreign trusts.

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King Charles faces awkward moment as taxpayer confronts him over rising UK cost of living https://atoogratuit.com/king-charles-faces-awkward-moment-as-taxpayer-confronts-him-over-rising-uk-cost-of-living/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 14:43:00 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/king-charles-faces-awkward-moment-as-taxpayer-confronts-him-over-rising-uk-cost-of-living/ In the aftermath of Queen Elizabeth II’s death, the crown passed to her heir. Although Charles automatically became king after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, organizing his coronation could take weeks or even months. However, the former Prince of Wales and now newly appointed monarch, King Charles’ interaction with a crowd took an unexpected […]]]>

In the aftermath of Queen Elizabeth II’s death, the crown passed to her heir. Although Charles automatically became king after the death of Queen Elizabeth II, organizing his coronation could take weeks or even months. However, the former Prince of Wales and now newly appointed monarch, King Charles’ interaction with a crowd took an unexpected turn on Friday when an angry British taxpayer confronted the monarch with a question regarding the financial burden the taxpayers must bear to be able to attend “his parade”.

The incident is believed to have happened in Cardiff, where Britain’s new monarch, King Charles III, was waving to the public outside Cardiff Castle. In the video, the royal can be seen smiling and shaking hands with people in the crowd, as a bearded man is seen shouting at the king: “While we struggle to heat our homes, we have to pay for your parade. The taxpayer pays £100m for you and why?” “You are not my king!” he said.

King Charles can be seen briefly turning towards the man, but soon a security official steps between the two as the Royal rushes forward. The monarch did not respond to the man’s accusation and confrontation as he silently turned away. The video was posted on social media platform Reddit with a caption, “Charles heckled today… heckler will soon be gone.”

Although it is not the first time the King has faced public outcry, he witnessed a similar incident when he arrived at the cathedral on Friday. A video that went viral on Twitter showed people booing the new king and his queen consort as they arrived at the cathedral.

Almost a quarter of UK adults plan to keep warm this winter: survey finds

One in four adults in Britain will not turn on the heating at all this winter amid soaring energy prices. According to a UK government survey, over 2,000 UK adults found that nearly 23% would go without heating during the winter. Reportedly, the figure was even higher for parents with children under 18. 27% said they would have to leave radiators cold.

“Families and pensioners across the country are making heartbreaking decisions because the government has failed to save them,” Christine Jardine, the Cabinet Office’s Lib Dem spokeswoman, remarked after the results of the election were announced. ‘investigation.

It must be mentioned that a large part of the royal family’s fortune comes from taxpayers’ money in the form of a “sovereign grant”, a payment given by the British Treasury to the royal household. The family would use the grant for official royal duties, such as payroll, visitation and housekeeping.

Experts think Prince William could be a better king than Charles

Sharing their opinion with The Guardian, several top correspondents who have covered the royal family for ages and observed each member minutely, felt that Prince William had better potential to connect, especially with the younger generation and would perform of his duties more responsibly than his father. Correspondents called William a more financially responsible person and said his approach to dealing with any predicament was much better than that of the new 73-year-old monarch. “There have been quite a few question marks about how Charles’ charities work and where the money comes from. I think William is less likely to take people easily who say, ‘Oh, it’s fine, sir, no, leave it with me, it’ll be fine,” Nicholas Owen, former ITN royal correspondent, told the UK-based publication.

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Virginia Taxpayers Get Rebates This Fall https://atoogratuit.com/virginia-taxpayers-get-rebates-this-fall/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 20:43:00 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/virginia-taxpayers-get-rebates-this-fall/ RICHMOND, Va. (WDBJ/Governor’s Office News Release) — About 3.2 million eligible taxpayers will receive one-time tax refunds of up to $250 in fall 2022 if they file individually, and up to $500 s They’re filing jointly, according to Governor’s Office Glenn Youngkin. To be eligible, taxpayers must file by November 1, 2022 and have had […]]]>

RICHMOND, Va. (WDBJ/Governor’s Office News Release) — About 3.2 million eligible taxpayers will receive one-time tax refunds of up to $250 in fall 2022 if they file individually, and up to $500 s They’re filing jointly, according to Governor’s Office Glenn Youngkin.

To be eligible, taxpayers must file by November 1, 2022 and have had tax payable in 2021. Starting September 19, taxpayers can go to tax.virginia.gov/rebate and check their eligibility for this tax. single tax refund.

Rebates are processed “first in/first out,” according to the governor’s office. People who deposited before July 1 should expect their remittances to arrive in late October. Those who deposit between July 1 and November 1 will receive their refunds within four months of their deposit date.

Taxpayers who received state tax refunds by direct deposit this year will likely receive their one-time tax refunds by direct deposit to the same bank accounts. All other eligible taxpayers will receive their refunds by mailed paper check.

“As Virginians face high inflation and prices resulting from policies set in Washington, these one-time tax refunds will help families reduce the cost of living,” Governor Glenn Youngkin said. “Past administrations have overtaxed Virginians and by returning taxpayer dollars to the taxpayers of Virginia, we are ensuring that hard-working Virginians can keep more of their paychecks during these difficult economic times.”

If a taxpayer owes money to Virginia Tax, or another state or local agency, the Commonwealth will use that person’s tax refund to settle that debt before sending the taxpayer the remainder of the refund (so as the contact details of the agency that was owed), according to Youngkin’s office. In the event that a taxpayer owes more than the rebate amount, Virginia Tax will send the taxpayer a letter explaining the use of the rebate toward the debt, along with contact information for the agency that was owed.

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Dual Status Alien Tax Return Filing Requirements (5 Key Facts) https://atoogratuit.com/dual-status-alien-tax-return-filing-requirements-5-key-facts/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 15:05:46 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/dual-status-alien-tax-return-filing-requirements-5-key-facts/ Click here to watch the video. Contents Filing of the income tax return for foreign taxpayers with dual status When it comes to filing US tax returns for taxpayers considered dual status aliens, it can become unnecessarily complicated at filing time. Indeed, with a dual status tax return, the taxpayer is only considered a US […]]]>

Click here to watch the video.

Contents

Filing of the income tax return for foreign taxpayers with dual status

When it comes to filing US tax returns for taxpayers considered dual status aliens, it can become unnecessarily complicated at filing time. Indeed, with a dual status tax return, the taxpayer is only considered a US person for part of the year. For the other part of the year, the Taxpayer is considered a nonresident alien and is not subject to United States tax on his worldwide income for that other part of the year. Depending on a dual taxpayer’s various sources of income—and whether or not they have foreign tax credits—this can have a significant impact on the overall tax impact of filing a US tax return. United. Let’s look at five important facts for dual status taxpayers.

Filing of the first year tax return

One of the most common types of situations involving a dual status taxpayer is the first year they become a US person. Consider the example of a resident alien who moves to the United States on an H-1B visa in April of that year and then resides the rest of the year in the United States. For the first part of the year, the person would be considered a nonresident alien (NRA) and subject to US tax only on their US source income. Conversely, for the second part of the year, the dual status filer would be considered a US person and would become subject to US tax on their worldwide income. Noting that there are certain filing requirements that the taxpayer must meet in order to file a dual status tax return.

Filing of last year’s tax return

Another very common tax situation that involves a dual status taxpayer is when a person renounces their US person status. Suppose a taxpayer moves to the United States on an H-1B visa, becomes a lawful permanent resident (LPR), and then relinquishes their status in March of last year (after 3 years of being an LPR). For that final tax year, they would generally also be considered a dual status taxpayer. Indeed, the taxpayer is only considered a US person during the first part of the year (subject to the TPS). For the rest of the year – assuming they resided outside the United States – they would be considered nonresident aliens and subject only to United States tax on their worldwide income (dual status filings of the final year may also have additional reporting requirements).

International reporting forms

For dual-status taxpayers with offshore accounts, investments, and other assets, they are still required to file any international information reporting forms for the part of the year they are considered a person. American. In other words, just because a taxpayer is only a U.S. person for part of the year does not mean they are exempt from reporting their foreign assets. An example is Form 8938 (FATCA).

As stated in the Form 8938 instructions:

  • If you are a specified individual for less than the entire tax year, the reporting period is the part of the year during which you are a specified individual.

6013(g) Election and FBAR

When a person makes a 6013(g) election for tax reporting purposes, they may have to file certain international reporting forms associated with filing a 1040 tax return. But, one important fact to keep in mind mind is that simply making a 6013(g) election does not necessarily mean that the taxpayer will become subject to FBAR.

As provided by FinCEN and summarized in the IRM:

  • “FinCEN clarified in the preamble to the bylaw that an election under IRC 6013(g), Election to treat a nonresident alien as a resident of the United States, or IRC 6013(h), joint filing, etc., for the year in which a nonresident alien becomes a resident of the United States, is not considered when determining residency status for FBAR purposes.”

Living abroad as an expat

If a U.S. person resides abroad as an expatriate for part of the year – but does not officially expatriate from the United States – they are still considered a U.S. person for the full year – subject to to make a treaty election to be treated as a foreign person for tax purposes. But, even if the taxpayer makes this type of treaty choice, it does not exclude him from the obligation to file certain international information reporting forms, such as the FBAR.

As provided in IRS Publication 5569:

  • Example: Kyle is a legal permanent resident United States Kyle is a citizen of the United Kingdom. Under a tax treaty, Kyle is a UK tax resident and elects to be taxed as a UK resident. Kyle is a US person for FBAR purposes. Tax treaties with the United States do not affect FBAR reporting obligations.

Did you miss the reporting deadlines for foreign accounts from previous years?

If a taxpayer has not properly reported their foreign accounts, assets, or investments in previous years, they may want to wait to file those documents for the current year. Indeed, taxpayers should try to avoid making a discreet disclosure (which can result in significant fines and penalties). To do this, taxpayers must submit to one of the offshore disclosure programs. Taxpayers may also consider speaking with a board-certified tax specialist who specializes exclusively in international tax matters before submitting to the IRS, to understand the various requirements.

Golding & Golding: International tax lawyers worldwide

Our team of FBAR lawyers specializes exclusively in international taxation, and more particularly IRS Offshore Disclosure. Contact our company today for assistance.

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You can get a refund from the IRS if you filed your taxes late during the pandemic https://atoogratuit.com/you-can-get-a-refund-from-the-irs-if-you-filed-your-taxes-late-during-the-pandemic/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 22:36:31 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/you-can-get-a-refund-from-the-irs-if-you-filed-your-taxes-late-during-the-pandemic/ You can get a refund from the IRS if you filed your taxes late during the pandemic By: Joe Hernandez | NPR Posted on: Sunday, September 11, 2022 < < Back to WASHINGTON DC (NPR) – Individuals and businesses who paid a penalty for filing their 2019 and 2020 tax returns late will automatically receive […]]]>

You can get a refund from the IRS if you filed your taxes late during the pandemic

By: Joe Hernandez | NPR

Posted on:

< < Back to

WASHINGTON DC (NPR) – Individuals and businesses who paid a penalty for filing their 2019 and 2020 tax returns late will automatically receive a refund from the IRS.

The IRS estimates it will reimburse more than $1.2 billion in penalties for failing to report to about 1.6 million taxpayers. Most refunds will be made by the end of September.

The tax agency announced last month that it would return the money it imposed on taxpayers for failing to file their taxes on time during the first two years of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The penalty relief issued today is another way the agency is supporting people during this unprecedented time,” IRS Commissioner Chuck Rettig said in an August statement announcing the refunds.

The IRS said issuing the refunds would also allow the agency “to focus its resources on processing pending tax returns and taxpayer correspondence” ahead of the 2023 filing season.

How refunds will work

Taxpayers who file their return late are generally charged a penalty of 5% of what they owe per month, up to a maximum of 25% of their unpaid tax bill.

It is not necessary to contact the agency to request your reimbursement. The IRS says refunds will be sent automatically.

Taxpayers who received a late filing fee but never paid it will have that fee waived.

Default penalties are not eligible for refund, the IRS said.

The vast majority of refunds will be sent by check while a small percentage of taxpayers will receive their refunds by direct deposit, according to the Taxpayer Advocate Service, an independent organization within the IRS.

To qualify for a refund under the program, individuals and businesses must have filed their late 2019 and 2020 tax returns by September 30, 2022. The Taxpayer Advocate Service urges taxpayers to file by electronic way.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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IRS floating rule to expand access to administrative appeals https://atoogratuit.com/irs-floating-rule-to-expand-access-to-administrative-appeals/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 00:04:00 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/irs-floating-rule-to-expand-access-to-administrative-appeals/ By Stephen K. Cooper (September 9, 2022, 8:04 p.m. EDT) – Taxpayers seeking to resolve disputes with the Internal Revenue Service regarding their unpaid tax debts would have greater access to the service’s administrative appeals office under proposed regulatory guidance published Friday. The proposed rule, required by the enactment of the Taxpayer First Act in […]]]>
By Stephen K. Cooper (September 9, 2022, 8:04 p.m. EDT) – Taxpayers seeking to resolve disputes with the Internal Revenue Service regarding their unpaid tax debts would have greater access to the service’s administrative appeals office under proposed regulatory guidance published Friday.

The proposed rule, required by the enactment of the Taxpayer First Act in July 2019, would establish how the IRS will operate its independent appeals office to resolve federal tax controversies that do not require litigation. In most cases, the taxpayer will have received a preliminary letter from the department determining liability, prompting a request for appeal.

The proposed rule would establish how the IRS will operate its…

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Rhode Island taxpayers will get $250 ‘stimulus checks’ next month https://atoogratuit.com/rhode-island-taxpayers-will-get-250-stimulus-checks-next-month/ Sun, 04 Sep 2022 21:43:01 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/rhode-island-taxpayers-will-get-250-stimulus-checks-next-month/ Another day, another state hands out stimulus checks: In August, Rhode Island Governor Dan McKee announced a new program to provide financial assistance to parents across the state. Rhode Island’s new Child Tax Rebate Stimulus Check Plan, part of the fiscal year 2023 budget, provides payments of $250 per child, with a limit of three […]]]>

Another day, another state hands out stimulus checks: In August, Rhode Island Governor Dan McKee announced a new program to provide financial assistance to parents across the state. Rhode Island’s new Child Tax Rebate Stimulus Check Plan, part of the fiscal year 2023 budget, provides payments of $250 per child, with a limit of three children.

Yes, you guessed it: another stimulus check-style program.

That means families across the state struggling with rising costs for food, gas and consumer goods could receive up to $750 this year.

In a press release after Democratic Gov. Dan McKee signed the budget package in June, a statement from the governor described the plan as a “sensible and essential way to keep our economy growing.”

House Speaker K. Joseph Shekarchi also stressed the importance of providing relief, citing rising costs, and noted that the decision was widely supported by the state legislature.

“Bringing this tax credit and other relief into the budget was a collaborative effort by many people who have worked hard to find ways to provide Rhode Islanders with financial relief,” said said Shekarchi.

The checks will be sent out in a few weeks and come at a time when states across the country are finding ways to redistribute excess taxes or spend federal funding for the American Rescue Plan Act before it expires.

Recovery checks: who is eligible?

Legal residents of Rhode Island are eligible to receive the refunds if their adjusted federal gross income is $100,000 or less, when they are single or married and filing separately. This also applies to those filing taxes as head of household or eligible widow/widower.

Married individuals who file jointly with an adjusted federal gross income of $200,000 or less are also eligible for the program.

Residents must have children who were eighteen or younger as of December 31 of last year and must also be domiciled in the state. No other qualifications are required.

Unlike some states where rebates are given to the majority of recipients by direct deposit, each child tax rebate check will be delivered by check to the address listed on the residents’ 2021 personal income tax return. There is no need to request the checks as they will be issued automatically to eligible recipients.

Stimulus checking will begin next month

For anyone who filed their original tax return for 2021, or an amended return, by August 31 this year, the rebates will begin to be paid as early as October.

For those who file their taxes before the extended October 17 filing deadline, however, the refund will arrive a little later, sometime during or after December 2022.

Click here for more information on checks.

Jack Buckby is a British author, counter-extremism researcher and journalist based in New York. Reporting from the UK, Europe and the US, it strives to analyze and understand left and right radicalisation, and reports on Western government approaches to pressing issues of today. His books and research papers explore these themes and offer pragmatic solutions to our increasingly polarized society.

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Baker’s supplementary budget would set aside $2.9 billion to return to taxpayers https://atoogratuit.com/bakers-supplementary-budget-would-set-aside-2-9-billion-to-return-to-taxpayers/ Fri, 02 Sep 2022 20:51:56 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/bakers-supplementary-budget-would-set-aside-2-9-billion-to-return-to-taxpayers/ BOSTON (WWLP) — On Wednesday, Governor Baker tabled a $1.6 billion supplementary budget and earmarked more than $2.9 billion to return to taxpayers under Section 62F. Massachusetts Supplementary Budget Proposal Includes Tax Refunds, MBTA, Health Care and School Safety Section 62F caps state-authorized tax collections at a level tied to annual growth in wages and […]]]>

BOSTON (WWLP) — On Wednesday, Governor Baker tabled a $1.6 billion supplementary budget and earmarked more than $2.9 billion to return to taxpayers under Section 62F.

Section 62F caps state-authorized tax collections at a level tied to annual growth in wages and salaries. Income above this ceiling must be returned to taxpayers through a credit. However, some lawmakers are pushing for the money to be returned by check to taxpayers. It is estimated that a taxpayer earning $75,000 would receive $250.

The supplementary estimates come on the heels of the Department of Revenue telling auditor Suzanne Bump that the department estimates about $2.94 billion is due back under the 1986 voter-approved law. Under the law, the auditor has until September 20 to certify these figures. However, Bump could certify the amount before the deadline.

“The great thing about this law that was passed in 1986 is that it allows every taxpayer in Massachusetts to get back the money they gave to the state. Contrary to what the legislature was trying to to do, which is to choose people to collect money, which we have all contributed to,” said Paul Craney of the Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance.

Baker’s office said if that amount is certified by the auditor, the state will still have a $2.3 billion surplus. The state’s surplus left the rainy day fund at a record $6.9 billion.

The legislature will have to take up Baker’s budget bill in informal sessions, where a lawmaker can derail an entire bill.

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County clerk hope is set to lose lawsuit against Registrar of Electors over ballot label https://atoogratuit.com/county-clerk-hope-is-set-to-lose-lawsuit-against-registrar-of-electors-over-ballot-label/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 03:10:10 +0000 https://atoogratuit.com/county-clerk-hope-is-set-to-lose-lawsuit-against-registrar-of-electors-over-ballot-label/ Jordan Marks, posing with an endorser, wanted his designation on the ballot to be “Assessor Taxpayer Advocate”. Picture via Facebook The Republican-endorsed nominee for San Diego County Assessor, Recorder and Clerk campaigned with signs posing as a taxpayer advocate. No problem. Preliminary decision in the trial of Jordan Marks. (PDF) But the 31-year-old jobseeker, lawyer […]]]>
Jordan Marks, posing with an endorser, wanted his ballot nomination to be
Jordan Marks, posing with an endorser, wanted his designation on the ballot to be “Assessor Taxpayer Advocate”. Picture via Facebook

The Republican-endorsed nominee for San Diego County Assessor, Recorder and Clerk campaigned with signs posing as a taxpayer advocate. No problem.

Preliminary decision in the trial of Jordan Marks. (PDF)

But the 31-year-old jobseeker, lawyer Jordan Zev Marks, also wanted his voting designation to be “Assessor Taxpayer Advocate”.

No, said county registrar of voters Cynthia Paes. So Marks sued to make it happen.

On Thursday, Superior Court Judge Keri Katz is expected to side with Paes and tell Marks he’ll have to settle for another Paes-approved voting label — “Chief Deputy Assessor.”

Marks — whose Nov. 8 opponent is former San Diego City Councilwoman and mayoral candidate Barbara Bry — is represented by Guillermo “Gil” Cabrera (himself a former candidate — for San Diego City Attorney in 2016).

On August 18, Cabrera filed a complaint for a so-called writ of peremptory warrant arguing that an “error is about to occur in the printing of a ballot.”

He wrote: “Release of the ballot with the disputed and unlawful designation of the ballot contained therein will cause irreparable harm to the voting public and the petitioner…for which damages would be insufficient.”

But Katz, who granted a “priority” hearing at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, issued an interim ruling Wednesday that denied his request to be tagged Assessor Taxpayer Advocate.

Katz agreed with the county registrar of voters.

“The court finds [Paes] establishes a high likelihood that a reasonably prudent voter will be confused by the term “taxpayer advocate” because the term does not identify the taxpayers for whom [Marks] is a lawyer,” Katz wrote in a three-page filing.

Although Marks says he is “taxpayers’ advocate for the assessor,” Katz continued, “such a role is not conveyed by the term ‘taxpayers’ advocate.’”

Duties of County Assessor, Recorder, County Clerk (PDF)

Thus, she said there is a “substantial likelihood” that her use of the term would confuse voters about Marks’ profession, vocation or occupation.

In fact, Marks works for the current clerk, Ernest Dronenburg Jr., who, at 79, is retiring at the end of his term in January 2023 after 12 years on the job.

In early May, Dronenburg promoted Marks to deputy chief assessor/clerk/county clerk.

Jordan Marks’ lawsuit against Registrar of Electors Cynthia Paes. (PDF)

A county announcement said Marks, with the office for nearly five years, “ensured taxpayer fairness, provided education to a variety of community and business organizations in the county, built community partnerships to advance office programs (DVETS, FBN, HOEX, Proposition 19 reforms, and commercial property filings, etc.), helped improve office processes and customer service for taxpayers, briefed the media on key events office and reviewed legislative proposals and new laws for effective implementation.

He added: “Jordan will continue to lead the Office of the Taxpayers Advocate in its new role and take on new responsibilities in the [office].”

Marks replaced Rolf Bishop, 73, who pleaded guilty in May to violating conflict of interest laws – recommending that a contractor hire his wife’s company to work on county projects. His sentencing is September 29.

On August 23, Dronenburg, a fellow Republican, fought for his potential successor, telling the court that Marks was a licensed appraiser, “and as such qualified and performs appraisals within the scope of his duties. Much of [his] duties and… professional activities include defending the interests of taxpayers. As such, “Assessor Taxpayer Advocate” is a fair and accurate description of [his] work.”

Paes said she could not comment on ongoing litigation. Bry and Cabrera also did not comment.

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